Bugsy Malone Wows Audiences

Bugsy Malone Wows Audiences

Rarely in a school production are the main characters actually older than the members of the original, iconic Alan Parker 1976 movie, but here the cast had the challenge of mastering the roles of children playing adults. It was done at breath-taking speed, with a brilliant backing band and big show choreography making it a feast for all the senses. 
 
Set in depression-hit, prohibition America, the feel-good gangster spoof was chosen, as Director Donald Forbes said: “Simply because it is so much fun. There are great parts, great tunes and lots and lots of splurge.” The plot revolves around the increasingly pantomimic efforts of two gangs to gain control of the splurge guns with sweethearts Bugsy Malone and Blousey Brown increasingly mixed up in the pandemonium.
 
At the heart of the action was Bugsy, played with a Cary Grant like glint by Josh Cheshire, a sweet-talking lady’s man who meets his match in the quick-witted beauty Blousey Brown played with style, elegance and charm by Amelia Phillpotts. Their counterparts in the viper’s nest of love and double-dealing that becomes Fat Sam’s Bar were the wise cracking Tallulah played by Daisy Holden, who despite her comic indifference still stands by the irascible, psychotic but somehow lovable Fat Sam played by the superb Olly Moss. With the main characters completed by the gun dealer Dandy Dan played by the debonair Matt Kaberry, the cast threw themselves headlong into the revelry and slapstick, often involving the audience, in the style of a latter-day Bruce Forsythe, as they were seated around the stage in the top ticket table seats The production was six months in the planning and three months in rehearsals and all the work showed in the stage craft and timing. A thrilling night for the young thespians.

Bugsy Malone February 2020
Bugsy Malone
Bugsy Malone Wows Audiences